Animal Welfare – Ban Shock http://banshock.org/ Fri, 11 Jun 2021 17:02:13 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.2 https://banshock.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/ban-shock-icon-150x150.png Animal Welfare – Ban Shock http://banshock.org/ 32 32 Humane Society of Berks County Reopens as Freedom Center for Animal Life-Saving | Local News https://banshock.org/humane-society-of-berks-county-reopens-as-freedom-center-for-animal-life-saving-local-news/ https://banshock.org/humane-society-of-berks-county-reopens-as-freedom-center-for-animal-life-saving-local-news/#respond Fri, 11 Jun 2021 16:30:00 +0000 https://banshock.org/humane-society-of-berks-county-reopens-as-freedom-center-for-animal-life-saving-local-news/

The Humane Society of Berks County was established on December 26, 1900 and spent its last 65 years at 1801 N. 11th St. until it closed on November 4, 2019, for a $ 2.1 million facility renovation that should take six to nine months.

The renovation of the facility, after numerous delays related to the COVID pandemic, has been completed and the facility has reopened as The Freedom Center for Animal Rescue June 1. A groundbreaking celebration and groundbreaking ceremony will take place on June 26.

“Our donor does not like his name to be associated with his charities. He likes them to be self-sufficient, ”said Karel I. Minor, CEO of Humane Pennsylvania, a regional nonprofit animal welfare and veterinary hospital management company. “He’s someone who is very attached to the concept of freedom, both for animals and the work we do and the world as a whole. He suggested freedom as a name and we said, ‘It has really makes a lot of sense. “”

Minor explained that the organization has been officially known as Humane Pennsylvania since 2014, when the Humane Society of Berks County merged with the Humane League of Lancaster County.

“We kept the two place names basically to avoid confusion while people understood what was going on with the organization,” he said.






Karel I. Minor, CEO of Humane Pennsylvania, checks out the new kennel at the Freedom Center for Animal Life-Saving, 1801 N. 11th St.



Minor was hired to replace Lindy Scholar as executive director of the Humane Society of Berks County after his death in 2004. Previously, he had worked at the Chester County Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, now known as Brandywine Valley SPCA.

Minor said now is the time to go for a new building name and stop using an organization name for the facility, he explained. He noted that Humane Pennsylvania reflects the broader scope of the organization’s reach.

Minor said the donor’s name, which he would not have identified except by saying he was a long-time major donor to the region, made a large cash contribution.

He also said that $ 600,000 of the cost of the project was contributed by the Giorgi Family Foundation under a grant Humane Pennsylvania received in 2018 that was spread over three years.

“Right now we’re about 60% fully funded,” Minor said. “We expected the remaining part of the capital-building campaign to kick off when COVID hit. So in addition to shutting down our building, it shut down the campaign because it’s a process in the face. face to face over lunch, in people’s living rooms. A lot of our major donors are older and we didn’t want to risk hurting them to help the animals. “

Even though Humane Pennsylvania was designated as an essential operation by the state because of its veterinary work, the construction project was deemed non-essential.

“We wanted the building we wanted,” said Damon March, COO of Humane Pennsylvania. “We didn’t want to compromise because of COVID. Because we knew it would be behind us in 10 years and frankly I don’t want to stay here and say, “It would be better, but 10 years ago we had to deal with COVID.” “






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Ellie Scheurich, dog behavior specialist from Humane Pennsylvania, walks past the new fully covered kennel at the Freedom Center for Animal Life-Saving on Wednesday morning, June 9, 2021. Peluche is a mixed breed male dog from Puerto Rico who was rescued in the frame of the Sato project. The Freedom Center for Animal Life-Saving, 1801 N. 11th St., Reading opened on June 1 and was previously the Humane Society of Berks County.



What’s up

The renovated building has indoor dog retention cages, which can be better heated and cooled for the comfort of animals and staff. Dog cages in the adoption area always have indoor / outdoor access. There are now two lobbies and a revamped adoption zone. The play areas have been reduced from three to five, and more are planned.

The accommodation capacity is roughly the same. It went from 112 to 110 animals, March said. He said the center can accommodate around 40 dogs, more if they are smaller.






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The surgical room at the Freedom Center for Animal Life-Saving in Humane Pennsylvania at 1801 N. 11th St., Reading, Wednesday morning June 9, 2021.



There are improved veterinary medicine facilities – an animal dental x-ray machine was installed on Wednesday and there is increased space in the examination area – which will be key to offering a new service.

“With our expansion into the animal welfare field, which is truly the culmination of 15 years of focused work on this, we realized that there was a need for a particular type of veterinary service and that it s ‘This was a walk-in clinic model, ”Minor said. “Essentially like human emergency care, but for animals.”

He stressed that the services will not be emergency care.

“It’s all vaccines, all wellness care, care for minor illnesses, treatment for fleas, mites; things that can cause big problems can get expensive, but if you can get them early , this fixes the problem and allows us to provide them with service at a lower cost, ”Minor said.

The implementation of emergency care is being delayed by a national shortage of veterinarians, he explained. Humane Pennsylvania needs to hire two and is competing with for-profit practices for a small group of employees.






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The main lobby of the Freedom Center for Animal Life-Saving, 1801 N. 11th St., Reading, Wednesday morning June 9, 2021. Humane Pennsylvania renovated the former Humane Society of Berks County and reopened it as the Freedom Center for Animal Life- Save June 1st.



‘Back to the mix’

Once Purcell Construction Co. from Denver, Lancaster County, completed the construction project, staff were brought into the building about a month ago to acclimatize, Minor said. Since adoptions and admission had moved to the Lancaster County location of Humane Pennsylvania during the construction project, the animals also had to be reintroduced.

The organization brought in 16 dogs on May 22 from The Sato project.

“They are basically homeless dogs from Puerto Rico – very sweet, very adoptable,” Minor said. “They all need to find a way to get home and since our community has a deep connection to Puerto Rico, it makes sense that we support them. It was a good opportunity for us to bring a number of dogs into our home. that time.”






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Ellie Scheurich, Canine Behavior Specialist from Humane Pennsylvania, outside the Freedom Center for Animal Life-Saving Wednesday morning June 9, 2021, with Peluche, a mixed-breed male dog from Puerto Rico who was rescued as part of the project Sato. The refuge at 1801 N. 11th St., Reading, recently reopened after a $ 2.1 million renovation project. The building was once known to the Humane Society of Berks County.



Minor said Humane Pennsylvania has been following CDC coronavirus guidelines from the start and is delighted to be able to work with people in Reading again.

“Being back in the mix with the ability to help people very directly and in person in a way that we haven’t for a long time been able to do is something we’ve all been looking forward to,” he said.


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The day – Mystic Aquarium’s priority is tourism money, not marine animals https://banshock.org/the-day-mystic-aquariums-priority-is-tourism-money-not-marine-animals/ https://banshock.org/the-day-mystic-aquariums-priority-is-tourism-money-not-marine-animals/#respond Thu, 10 Jun 2021 22:09:37 +0000 https://banshock.org/the-day-mystic-aquariums-priority-is-tourism-money-not-marine-animals/

In the May 21 issue, former Mystic Aquarium public relations director Peter Glankoff, now a resident of New Mexico, used a letter to the editor to praise the accomplishments of his highly paid former boss, 500,000 $ per year, CEO Dr. Stephen M. Coan. , President and CEO of the Aquarium, who said, “Animal welfare has always been at the forefront of what we do here at Mystic Aquarium.

Is that so?

Meanwhile, Glankoff says challenging Coan’s very high salary is “small.”

Zoos and aquariums remove animals from their natural environment and display them in order to sell tickets. Due to the lack of space, food and veterinary care, these animals can suffer from debilitating health problems. Most die prematurely. Paid spokesperson Glankoff and highly paid Mystic Aquarium officials such as Coan should remember that in 2016, a young adult male beluga named Miki died while in their care. Medical complications have been cited.

Miki died while on display at the Mystic Aquarium for just a few months, on loan from the Shedd Aquarium in Chicago. What really happened to this poor creature in Coan’s care?

Mystic Aquarium claims the transfer of whales from Canada is a matter of research. However, as PETA points out, not only does being held in captivity cause extreme mental stress in animals, it is also physically damaging. Chlorine and copper sulfate used to keep tanks clear peeled the skin of dolphins and can cause blindness in dolphins and seals. Have mercy on their poor cousins, the beluga whales, who are held captive at the Mystic Aquarium in what to them is only a giant tub.

The Animal Welfare Institute and other animal advocates point out that the recent importation from Canada could be too stressful, possibly fatal, for belugas and that it would have made more sense for scientists to come to the animals. Instead, Coan had them shipped.

Note that Mystic Aquarium and its highly paid director, Coan, have received major backing from major gambling and entertainment companies such as The Coca-Cola Company, Foxwoods Resort Casino, Resorts World Sentosa, and the gunmaker. United Technologies Corporation. Coan sits on the Connecticut Tourism Commission and the Governor’s Tourism Advisory Council, both of which promote the Connecticut circus-like display of hapless and helpless wild animals at the Mystic Aquarium.

Why is this allowed?

And who defends Coan. His “retired” public relations flack and still paid advertising consultant, Mr. Glankoff, whose experience includes promoting marketing at “Sin City” in Las Vegas, a short-term stint at the Bronx Zoo, before his arrival at Mystic Seaport and Mystic Aquarium. He retired to New Mexico on a paid aquarium consultant contract.

Could Stephen Coan have found someone with less integrity to sing his dubious praises than Peter Glankoff?

Dr Richard Parker is a former professor of applied zoological sciences at the Earls Institute of Animal Psychology in Montreal, Canada, and is now retired.


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For the Love of Cats funds FGCU scholarship https://banshock.org/for-the-love-of-cats-funds-fgcu-scholarship/ https://banshock.org/for-the-love-of-cats-funds-fgcu-scholarship/#respond Thu, 10 Jun 2021 04:04:00 +0000 https://banshock.org/for-the-love-of-cats-funds-fgcu-scholarship/

Jim and Jan Rich, founders of For the Love of Cats COURTESY PHOTO

For the Love of Cats has partnered with Florida Gulf Coast University on a new scholarship program for biology students. The aim is to generate more interest in a career in veterinary medicine among FGCU students enrolled in the biology course.

The scholarships are awarded based on various criteria including leadership, merit and academic achievement. The program is designed to mentor students interested in pursuing a career in veterinary medicine with the hope that they will bring their skills home to meet the needs of Southwest Florida. “Our goal is to engage FGCU students in veterinary career opportunities in Southwest Florida and to help bring attention to the needs of the animal welfare community. The Southwest Florida veterinary community is really grappling with staffing needs. This greatly affects their overall ability and ability to contribute to Southwest Florida animal welfare. We are very excited about our partnership with the FGCU and our ability to help students interested in pursuing a career in veterinary medicine. »Jan Rich, Founder of For the Love of Cats.

The Love of Cats Scholarship Program offers partnership with local businesses and businesses. These leaders are joining together to make an impact on Collier County’s future health and animal welfare. This year the program is funded by Bobbie Confer of Remax Realty on Marco Island, Dr Jon Strohmeyer, Center for Facial Plastic Surgery and Dr Cindy Strohmeyer, Dermatology Specialists from Naples.

“The Love of Cats Scholarship is a new and unique opportunity for local FGCU students in Southwest Florida,” said Georgia North, assistant director of development, FGCU. “The generous scholarship will cover almost half of a full year’s tuition fee for a deserving student. This is the very first scholarship created for a student who wishes to pursue a career in veterinary medicine and we are very excited about this partnership. “

The For the Love of Cats scholarship will be awarded to a student by the FGCU for the 2021-2022 school year. The scholarships will be officially presented by the FGCU Foundation with an awards ceremony in November 2021.

For the Love of Cats is a 501 (c) (3) non-profit organization in Marco Island dedicated to saving the lives of abandoned cats and kittens in the community. It is an animal welfare group operating with donations from the public since 2002.

For more information, contact Georgia North, Deputy Director of Development for the FGCU Foundation at 813-352-5637 or gnorth@FGCU.edu. |


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Concerns raised about targeted inspections versus full inspections at research facilities https://banshock.org/concerns-raised-about-targeted-inspections-versus-full-inspections-at-research-facilities/ https://banshock.org/concerns-raised-about-targeted-inspections-versus-full-inspections-at-research-facilities/#respond Wed, 09 Jun 2021 11:50:04 +0000 https://banshock.org/concerns-raised-about-targeted-inspections-versus-full-inspections-at-research-facilities/

Executives at a Harvard University-based legal clinic question whether a federal agency is risking the welfare of research animals by performing partial and targeted inspections, rather than full inspections, of certain research facilities.

In response, officials from the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service of the Ministry of Agriculture say that far from weakening the inspection process, the risk-based inspection system makes the best use of the resources of the organization. agency by focusing attention on the facilities that need it most.

In early May, Science magazine published an article outlining an APHIS policy allowing targeted inspections under the Animal Welfare Act of research facilities accredited by AAALAC International, a private, non-profit organization that includes ‘AVMA among its member organizations.

Dr. Donna Matthews Jarrell, president of the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine, said ACLAM leaders and other members of the laboratory animal community were aware of changes to the Department’s policy. United States Agriculture regarding Animal Welfare Act inspections and that these changes have been major talking points at meetings, rallies and webinars in recent years.

Full or targeted inspections

APHIS and Harvard University Animal Law & Policy Clinic officials disagree on whether full inspections are required under the AWA and whether targeted inspections can provide sufficient guarantees that research animals are treated well.

Katherine Meyer, director of the Harvard Legal Clinic, said in a message to JAVMA that the law requires full inspections every year to ensure that laboratories meet minimum standards of humane treatment.

Animals are already sacrificing their lives, she said, and they deserve protections that ensure their care.

The Harvard Clinic provided a copy of a USDA memorandum, labeled “for internal use only,” which states that APHIS adopted a policy in February 2019 that required only targeted inspections to be performed at medical facilities. AAALAC accredited research, unless facilities require full inspections. The document indicates that, of the first 322 inspections carried out since the policy was adopted, 151 were at AAALAC-accredited facilities, and 91 of those facilities underwent targeted inspections.

“We heard that some facilities requested a full inspection because they feared the emergence of a ‘targeted inspection’ (since such inspections have always taken place in response to complaints about animal welfare or animal welfare. direct non-compliance), ”the USDA note states. “We’ve also heard that facilities and inspectors value the ability to focus inspection, and inspectors remain confident about the welfare of animals at the facility.”

APHIS spokesperson Lyndsay Cole said AAALAC accreditation is a factor considered in determining whether a facility will undergo a targeted inspection, as is a facility’s previous compliance with the AWA. Inspections go unannounced, laboratory facility managers do not know whether they will be subject to a targeted inspection, inspectors can decide at any time to conduct a full inspection instead, and the agency keeps records. information on how it determines which facilities will receive targeted inspections versus full inspections. confidential.

Inspection standards and practices

Dr Kathryn Bayne, CEO of AAALAC International, said in a statement that the organization strives to ensure responsible care and use of animals and that AAALAC’s accreditation program is complementary to inspections of the ‘USDA. A USDA policy of performing targeted inspections by default at all AAALAC accredited facilities would be impractical as USDA and AAALAC International have substantial differences in their surveillance programs, she said. declared.

Dr Bayne noted that AAALAC’s accreditation standards exceed federal requirements and that its accreditation program is part of an animal research oversight matrix that includes APHIS and the National Institutes of Health Office. of Laboratory Animal Welfare. AAALAC has been promoting the humane and responsible care and use of research animals for over 50 years, she said.

Dr Stuart Leland, chairman of the Veterinary Consortium for Research Animal Care and Welfare and director of research integrity and assurance at Princeton University, believes federal law gives APHIS the discretion to conduct its investigations and decide on the best way to ensure the welfare of the animals. Focusing resources where they are needed most could help improve animal welfare in institutions that lack resources or have not proven their ability to comply with the AWA and its regulations, he said. -he declares.

He and his counterparts at other research institutions have known for years that APHIS can conduct targeted inspections in any of the three areas regulated by the AWA: animals, facilities, or records. The two most recent inspections of its AWA-related facilities were both focused, the first on animals and the second on records.

Dr Leland also said that targeted inspections could allow APHIS officials to delve into certain aspects of a facility, rather than taking a general look at all the activities regulated by the AWA during each inspection.

When asked if targeted inspections were a good policy, Dr Leland said he would wait to see data from the agency that would allow for comparisons over several years in terms of violations found and citations issued. Finding a similar number of violations and citations would suggest that the inspection system at least meets the quality of the previous system, he said, although he acknowledged that other variables could affect those numbers.

Public notice

The Science article and a related announcement from the Harvard Law School Animal Law & Policy Clinic both suggest that APHIS officials adopted the policy without a public announcement, meaning the public may not have been aware of the change. A legal clinic researcher discovered the policy in documents obtained through a public records request filed on behalf of two advocacy organizations, Rise for Animals and Animal Legal Defense Fund.

Still, Dr. Donna Matthews Jarrell, president of the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine, said in a statement that ACLAM leaders and other members of the laboratory animal community were aware of the changes in the USDA policy and that these changes had been a major discussion. at meetings, rallies and webinars in 2019. She noted that discussions at one of those meetings, the annual Public Accountability in Medicine and Animal Care and Use Conference, included discussions on the topic that were open to the public.


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Raise American launches brand of 100% organic, grass-fed beef https://banshock.org/raise-american-launches-brand-of-100-organic-grass-fed-beef/ https://banshock.org/raise-american-launches-brand-of-100-organic-grass-fed-beef/#respond Tue, 08 Jun 2021 19:42:00 +0000 https://banshock.org/raise-american-launches-brand-of-100-organic-grass-fed-beef/

GORDON, Neb., June 8, 2021 / PRNewswire / – Raising American is proud to announce the launch of its 100% American, 100% grass-fed organic and flexitarian beef product line. Raising American recognizes consumer demand for meat from sustainable sources and has answered the call. AT Raising American, we advocate regenerative agriculture and its positive impact on agricultural ecosystems. We also believe in total transparency and intense oversight of our product range and supply chain: two essential pillars of trust, on which our brand is based. In this, we are RAISING THE BAR for the organic beef industry! Our goal is for American Beef Eaters and Flexitarians to feel good about feeding their families high quality organic beef products.

the Raising American The brand was born because we wanted to bring high-quality, grass-fed cuts of American beef straight from family farms to sustainability-conscious consumers. We do this by managing our beef supply chain, working hand in hand with ranchers to raise livestock humane and owning our own processing facility. AT Raising American, we work to put premium, sustainable organic taste at the forefront of our offerings. Our products, which include fresh steaks, ground meats, meatballs, mixed patties, seasoned and pre-cooked entrees, sausages, cooking ingredients, etc. in industry. Our cattle are grazed, healthy and treated humanely.


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NGO Tezpur ensures that stray animals do not go hungry during the pandemic https://banshock.org/ngo-tezpur-ensures-that-stray-animals-do-not-go-hungry-during-the-pandemic/ https://banshock.org/ngo-tezpur-ensures-that-stray-animals-do-not-go-hungry-during-the-pandemic/#respond Tue, 08 Jun 2021 02:00:00 +0000 https://banshock.org/ngo-tezpur-ensures-that-stray-animals-do-not-go-hungry-during-the-pandemic/

The animal welfare initiative of the UCI (UnCivilized Indian) Foundation, based in Tezpur, ‘The Voice’ works for stray animals by organizing regular feeding sessions and rescue operations for injured animals. Their initiative ‘The voice‘started in 2019 with the main goal of saving animals, feeding them, and encouraging people to adopt homeless creatures.

PC @ Instagram
Pc @ instagram

Talk with EstMojoUCI Foundation member Puja Gupta said: “We mainly focus on rescue operations and animal feeding. We have rescued various animals from afar, for example dogs, cats, cows, wild birds, monkeys, wild snakes, turtles, etc. and later we provide them with medical treatment. Feeding sessions are done regularly, and it started on the initiative. Previously, when things were normal, we fed the animals four days a week, but due to this lockdown, feeding sessions are held regularly knowing that they have almost nothing to eat during this difficult time. “

PC @ Facebook
PC @ Facebook

“The Voice” consists of four wings in Tezpur, Dhekiajuli, Ranchi and Lakimpur where similar wellness activities are carried out. In previous years, our team has installed several feed and water stations created with animal and bird waste in several locations. We have also started three to four adoption camps where we encourage people on a large scale to adopt stray puppies and kittens so they can get a safe shelter to stay and grow. Fortunately, we have seen positive responses from this initiative and more and more people have come forward to help and adopt these animals, ”she added.

Pc @ instagram
Pc @ instagram

Initially, people did not welcome the idea of ​​feeding stray animals near their homes, but over time more and more people come forward and help stray animals by saying “Good things take time.” “.

Ankita Roy, another member of the UCI foundation spoke with EstMojo on the type of response they received from the population. She said: “At first people were very worried and they did not welcome the idea of ​​feeding stray animals near their homes, but they gradually realized that they too were hungry, just like us. . So, they started to sponsor and give whatever they could for their birthdays or any special occasion. People also ask us for help even during the midnight hours to save animals or animals in need of urgent treatment. ”




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Finca la Castellana Animal welfare https://banshock.org/finca-la-castellana-animal-welfare/ https://banshock.org/finca-la-castellana-animal-welfare/#respond Sun, 06 Jun 2021 12:05:20 +0000 https://banshock.org/finca-la-castellana-animal-welfare/

Finca la Castellana Animal welfare

The pandemic hasn’t changed the number of animals we save each week, it has increased the number.

The greater number of pets that come to us from people who lost their jobs and had to return to their home countries, rather than street animals. But it doesn’t matter to us where they come from, the point is, they need our help, and we need the public’s help to be able to continue.

We are organizing an open house on Sunday June 13 from 12 p.m. to 3 p.m. Live entertainment from Alfie G Music, barbecue, drinks, cakes, raffle and other various stands.

2 € entry and you can come and meet all our animals, a beautiful afternoon out for the whole family. Our third charity shop opens in Los Dolces on Monday June 14th, step down for a complimentary glass of cava while browsing through the gifts that have been given.

Do not miss our 50/50 club, 200 tickets, 10 € per ticket, half of your money goes directly to the association, the other half for the prices. This club operates quarterly and the next draw will be July 31st, all prizes go straight to your bank account, so you can participate wherever you are in the world.

We have just launched a charity animal art competition which will run until October 4, the judgment will take place on October 10. There are fantastic prices, three categories, children under 10, € 5 per entry, children 10-16, € 5 per entry and adults € 10 per entry.

Your work of art can be a painting, a drawing, a poem, a sculpture of an animal that you own or know.

For a registration form, please send an email to fincalacastellana@gmail.com or WhatsApp 603251004. For any other information on our events, adoption of a dog or cat, charity shops or ways to help us raise funds, see our web page www.fincalacastellan.org or our Facebook pages “Finca la Castellana” and “Chatterie Finca la Castellana”.

Main picture:

Izzy, a mother dog who came to us from Malaga where she was found tied up in the campo with her six babies. But not only is she treating them but six others that the Murcia police brought to us, found in a bag. She does a fantastic job taking care of them all.


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Protesters demand better housing for beagles kept on Lakeshore property https://banshock.org/protesters-demand-better-housing-for-beagles-kept-on-lakeshore-property/ https://banshock.org/protesters-demand-better-housing-for-beagles-kept-on-lakeshore-property/#respond Sat, 05 Jun 2021 20:45:52 +0000 https://banshock.org/protesters-demand-better-housing-for-beagles-kept-on-lakeshore-property/

Content of the article

Protesters were out for a second day on Saturday, trying to draw attention to alleged mistreatment of beagles on rural property in Lakeshore – but overnight seven beagles were reported stolen and the OPP. Ontario is investigating.

Landowner Philip Byrne, an animal control officer for several Essex County municipalities, spoke to police on Saturday morning as the protest was underway.

Approached by the Star, Byrne declined to answer questions, saying he would have a statement at a later date.

“I have no comment at this time,” Byrne said. “But social media took a bit of a beating on me.”

The OPP released a statement on Saturday afternoon saying it responded to a report of the theft of seven beagles from an address on Lions Club Road in Lakeshore, adding that the property was burgled overnight.

“Police are looking for help in locating the stolen dogs as soon as possible to avoid undue damage or stress to the animals,” the new statement said.

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A conversation takes place between an animal activist, the owner and an OPP officer as a dozen animal activists organize a rally on Saturday June 5, 2021, alleging the dogs are being kept in poor conditions .
A conversation takes place between an animal activist, the owner and an OPP officer as a dozen animal activists organize a rally on Saturday June 5, 2021, alleging the dogs are being kept in poor conditions . Photo by Dax Melmer /Windsor Star

Protest organizer Sherri Breaton, who described herself as an animal rescuer who has transported more than 1,500 dogs over the past eight years from the southern United States to new homes in Canada, claimed the Beagles are kept in cages in a shed in the middle of a lot with no other buildings nearby.

“We are rescuing dogs that are in exactly the same situation,” Breaton said.

“There are eight, maybe 10 dogs – we can’t tell because you can’t see it,” she said of a fenced area with a shed-like structure about 100 meters from the road. “It has an electric fence all around so that no one can enter the property.

“These dogs are outside 24/7. It doesn’t matter if it’s freezing cold, if it’s a thunderstorm, it doesn’t matter what these dogs are around all the time. No human interaction, nothing, ”Breaton said.

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Breaton claimed the dogs are kept “with the bare minimum of dog standards in kennels – little boxes in an empty field without supervision.”

She wants the demonstrations to put pressure on the municipalities to modify the orders “so that higher standards of care are applied and that the officers of the orders can enforce them”.

Ontario Provincial Police officers are pictured after investigating a property in Belle River where animal rights activists allege dogs are being kept in poor conditions on Saturday, June 5, 2021.
Ontario Provincial Police officers are pictured after investigating a property in Belle River where animal rights activists allege dogs are being kept in poor conditions on Saturday, June 5, 2021. Photo by Dax Melmer /Windsor Star

Melanie Coulter, executive director of the Windsor / Essex County Humane Society, said the province took over all animal law enforcement as of January 2020.

“Before December 31st, 2019, we would have been responsible for going out, but now those calls are going to the provincial animal welfare service, ”Coulter said when reached on Saturday. “So it would be them who would investigate. “

Provincial animal welfare authorities have been contacted.

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A call to the Animal Welfare Ontario helpline at 1-833-9-ANIMAL (926-4625) provided a recorded message regarding “the incident on Lions Club Road in Belle River”.

The post said the agency was aware of the “situation and the matter was under review” and asked anyone with “first-hand information or eyewitness testimony directly related to the Lions incident. Club Road “to report it to an operator.

Ontario Provincial Police officers investigate a property in Belle River where animal rights activists allege dogs are being kept in poor conditions on Saturday, June 5, 2021.
Ontario Provincial Police officers investigate a property in Belle River where animal rights activists allege dogs are being kept in poor conditions on Saturday, June 5, 2021. Photo by Dax Melmer /Windsor Star

Protester Dane Blandford said photos of the dogs inside the cages, taken by a stranger, were shared on social media, prompting him to attend the protest.

“I consider myself to be an animal activist so whenever I see an endangered animal I love to be here,” said Blandford. “I believe what this man is doing here is absolutely legal. This is why we are here. As the sign says here: the legal is not ethical.

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He also wants better laws to protect all animals.

“We are here today to support the Beagles who have already suffered too much,” said Blandford. “They live in terrible conditions, which we just think are appalling.

“We have the impression that these animals are not protected by law and that must change immediately.”

Police are asking anyone with information about this or any other incident to call the Ontario Provincial Police at 1-888-310-1122.

If you would like to remain anonymous, call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 (TIPS) or leave an anonymous message online at www.catchcrooks.com where you may be eligible to receive a cash reward of up to 2 $ 000.

jkotsis@postmedia.com

twitter.com/KotsisStar

Some of the beagles that the OPP said were caught on Belle River property.
Some of the beagles that the OPP said were caught on Belle River property. Photo by photo of the OPP document

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For the love of cats cc https://banshock.org/for-the-love-of-cats-cc/ https://banshock.org/for-the-love-of-cats-cc/#respond Sat, 05 Jun 2021 04:06:01 +0000 https://banshock.org/for-the-love-of-cats-cc/

Photos submitted


For the Love of Cats is honored to partner with Florida Gulf Coast University (FGCU) on our new scholarship program for their biology students. Our goal is to generate more interest in a career in veterinary medicine among FGCU students enrolled in the biology program.

The scholarships are awarded based on various criteria including leadership, merit and academic achievement. The program is designed to mentor students interested in pursuing a career in veterinary medicine with the hope that they will bring their skills home to meet the needs of Southwest Florida. “Our goal is to engage FGCU students in veterinary career opportunities in Southwest Florida and to help bring attention to the needs of the animal welfare community. The Southwest Florida veterinary community is really grappling with staffing needs. This greatly affects their overall ability and ability to contribute to Southwest Florida animal welfare. We are very excited about our partnership with the FGCU and our ability to help students interested in pursuing a career in veterinary medicine, ”said Jan Rich, Founder of For the Love of Cats.

The Love of Cats Scholarship Program offers partnership with local businesses and businesses. These leaders join us in making an impact on the future health of our county and our animal welfare. This year our program is generously funded by Bobbie Confer from Remax Realty in Marco Island, Dr Jon Strohmeyer from the Center for Facial Plastic Surgery and Dr Cindy Strohmeyer, Dermatology Specialists from Naples.



A blind cat takes a veterinary exam.

“The Cat Love Scholarship is a new and unique opportunity for local FGCU students in Southwest Florida,” said George North, assistant director of development at FGCU. “The generous scholarship will cover almost half of a full year’s tuition fee for a deserving student. This is the very first scholarship created for a student who wishes to pursue a career in veterinary medicine and we are very excited about this partnership. On behalf of the FGCU Foundation, I thank For the Love of Cats for investing in our students and their future success. It will really make a significant difference! The For the Love of Cats scholarship will be awarded to a student by the FGCU for the 2021-2022 school year. The scholarships will be officially presented by the FGCU Foundation with an awards ceremony in November 2021.

For the Love of Cats is a 501c3 non-profit organization located in Marco Island, Florida dedicated to saving the lives of abandoned cats and kittens in the community. We are an animal welfare group operating with donations from the public since 2002.

Our mission is to end the cruelty of pet overpopulation. Donated funds go to our programs which include neutering community cats through TNR (Trap, Neutral, Return), helping low-income families with emergency veterinary and welfare care, providing pet food to families struggling with the effects of the pandemic and subsidized adoption fees and senior cat supplies to the elderly as well as other support programs to help people keep their pets of company.




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Bantam church holding Healing Manger support group with goats https://banshock.org/bantam-church-holding-healing-manger-support-group-with-goats/ https://banshock.org/bantam-church-holding-healing-manger-support-group-with-goats/#respond Fri, 04 Jun 2021 19:16:38 +0000 https://banshock.org/bantam-church-holding-healing-manger-support-group-with-goats/

BANTAM – St. Paul’s Church, Route 202, Bantam, is hosting “Healing Manger” this summer. Residents can meet Healing Hoofbeats of Connecticut Goats for a free support group open to anyone in need of healing, especially those struggling with second half of life issues such as aging or chronic illness. , isolation and loneliness, or loss. Sessions take place at 6:30 p.m. on June 24, July 22 and August 26.

Sessions are held outdoors in St. Paul’s with appropriate precautions. In case of bad weather, sessions will be held indoors with appropriate precautions at Healing Hoofbeats of CT. Limited places are available.


RSVP to office@saintpaulsbantam.org or by calling 860-567-8838 by June 17th.

Celebrate Torrington graduates in the town parade

TORRINGTON – The graduation of Class 2021 at Torrington High School is scheduled for June 18. For the second year, the festivities will begin with a parade of senior class cars in the east of the city. Students, parents and teachers ask the community to settle down along the parade route to cheer on the elderly passing by.

Students will gather in the THS parking lot at 4:00 p.m. get together for a parade. Using their own vehicles, students will depart at 4:15 p.m. and follow the same route as last year: East of THS, left on Torringford West, through Kennedy Drive to continue to West Pearl, through 183 to East Pearl, then left onto Torrington Middle School.

After arriving at TMS, students will return to high school for the graduation procession at 6 p.m.

The rainy date for the graduation and parade is June 19.

Schools in the city receive several grants

TORRINGTON – Vogel Wetmore and Torringford elementary schools have received a $ 4,000 grant from the William Caspar Graustein Memorial Fund, according to a statement.

In addition, Vogel Wetmore received $ 1,500 from the Northwest Connecticut Community Foundation grant made possible by the Carlton D. Fyler and Jenny R. Fyler, a foundation fund to purchase books and resources with main characters who reflect the population of the school district. In addition to these funds, the Vogel Wetmore PTO contributed $ 200 to this initiative.

“It is important that children see themselves represented in literature. Seeing characters who are like them, living where they live or having a family structure like them, encourages a positive self-perception in children, ”said Mary Lee Quinn, Media Specialist at Vogel Wetmore. The diverse literature also encourages students to embrace things that are unfamiliar to them. This, hopefully, leads to debate, tolerance and understanding. In turn, the child learns more about his sense of place in society. Quinn added, “I am delighted to have received these funds. It is very important to have reading material that reflects our diverse student body. I love it when our students see themselves reflected in the literature available to them.

Volunteer board of directors, commission members wanted

WON – Volunteers are needed to serve on city councils and commissions. Residents who may find themselves with time available and interest are encouraged to contact the CEO’s office or Selectman Steve Sedlack to inquire about the opportunities.

Economic Development Commission, meets the first and third Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m.

Wetlands and Inland Waters Commission, meets the third Wednesday of the month at 7 p.m.

Recreation Council, meets the first Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m.

The subscription appeals committee meets when convened by the president.

The energy committee meets when convened by the chairman.

Contact Terry Hall in the General Manager’s office by phone at 860-738-6078 or by email at: thall@townofwinchester.org for more information. Selectman Steven Sedlack can be reached by phone at 860-379-5310.

The Warner Theater welcomes volunteers

TORRINGTON – After 14 months of closure, the Warner Theater once again welcomed more than 50 volunteers on May 25.

“The re-engagement of our volunteers is a big step towards our reopening,” said Director of Relations, Lesley Budny.

The meeting was informal and opened with presentations followed by an update on where the Warner Theater has been during Covid, where they are at with their current reopening strategy and where they are heading as ‘organization. Volunteers were informed of upcoming scheduled events as well as education and stage programs at Warner. Post-Covid volunteer re-engagement efforts will continue over the next few months depending on the comfort level of volunteers returning to the Warner Theater.

Those interested in becoming a Warner Theater volunteer should contact Director of Development Kayle Crowley at kcrowley@warnerthatre.org.

The little guild receives a grant

CORNWALL – The John T. and Jane A. Wiederhold Foundation has awarded the Little Guild of St. Francis in West Cornwall a 2020-2021 Animal Welfare Grant of $ 29,000 to support capital improvements and l equipment, members recently announced.

The John T. and Jane A. Wiederhold Foundation Animal Welfare Grant will generously fund new computers and printers; new network and Internet cabling; repair of the dog park fence and a heating unit in the cat room; installation of a new animal examination room; installation of plexiglass in the hall; removal of dangerous trees; and the redevelopment of the parking lot and the Petite Guilde alley.

“The Little Guild is grateful for John T. and Jane A. Wiederhold’s legacy of love to protect and enhance animal welfare, and for the outstanding support of our mission to save, care for and love them. homeless cats and dogs, ”the members said.


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