WA government allocates $500,000 to animal welfare groups | weekly farm

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$500,000 in grant dollars has been awarded by the state government to help rescued pets and wildlife.

Round one funding for the “Animal Welfare Grants Program” supported 16 community-based nonprofit projects aimed at promoting the welfare of companion animals and rescued wildlife across the country. Western Australia.

Additional grants of $500,000 are now available for another round of funding.

“Spay it Forward” is one of many projects that will provide subsidized de-sexing and microchipping of cats and dogs to concession card holders or families in need.

The funding will also support a pilot project providing low-cost veterinary services to owners of vulnerable pets, a caregiver support program for abandoned pet rabbits, and fund new critical care incubators and diagnostic equipment for the rehabilitation of wildlife.

animal welfare grant scheme.” title=”Agriculture and Food Minister Alannah MacTiernan holds a rabbit as she meets some of the successful applicants for the state government’s animal welfare grant scheme.” width=”2800″ height=”1848″/>

Agriculture and Food Minister Alannah MacTiernan holds a rabbit as she meets some of the successful applicants for the state government’s animal welfare grant scheme.

Successful regional projects include a nursery in the Deep South to help kangaroos and possum joeys transition to release, a program providing free veterinary care and de-sexing to animals in remote West Kimberley communities, and facilities based in the Wheatbelt to provide safe temporary accommodation for animals whose carers are fleeing domestic violence.

This first round of funding is part of the government’s $2 million Animal Welfare Grant program that will run for four years.

The second round of grants under the program is now open, with grants of up to $50,000 available from a total funding pool of $500,000.

Agriculture and Food Minister Alannah MacTiernan said non-profit community organizations play an important role in maintaining the welfare of companion and native animals and encouraged eligible groups to apply to the grant program.

“Western Australians see animal welfare and care as a priority,” Ms MacTiernan said.

“There has been a high level of demand for these animal welfare grants in metropolitan and regional areas of the state, underscoring the need for services that protect and care for vulnerable animals.

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